Student life

At Keyano College we believe that student success involves having a great experience both inside and outside of the classroom. Our Student Life team are dedicated to providing students with a vibrant college experience with social events, engaging initiatives, and ways to get involved.

 Meet your Student Life Lead - Kryston Munnings
Student Life LeadKryston has been living in Canada for three years - originally from the warm, sunny, and tropical country of Belize. During his time in Canada, he has completed a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Memorial University of Newfoundland and has been actively advocating for the rights of international and racialized students through various positions of leadership. Kryston is excited to use his position to develop and implement initiatives surrounding equity, diversity, and inclusion for the Keyano College community.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, maintaining social interactions during this time is important, so he urges students, faculty, and staff to reach out to him by email or cell 780-742-3488 to set up a virtual hangout and drink coffee.

He genuinely looks forward to having the opportunity to meet everyone, and is excited about what we can all accomplish together in the future.

Student Life Events

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Student Life at Keyano College

Black History Month

Noel Ganduri

What does it mean to be black?
‘Black’ is my identity, it points to my ancestry. Blackness gives me perspective in many respects, it reminds me of where I come from, and the unique values which have shaped me into the person that I am.
What does Black History Month mean to you?
Black history month is a month to reflect upon how far God has taken me personally as an African, and how he has emancipated my fellow brothers and sisters, some through the waters, while others through the fire. For me February is a month to extend a helping hand to another fellow human being – it is a month for blacks to give back to the society.
What advice do you have for current and future Black employees at Keyano College?
Keyano is one of the most diverse workplaces I know in Alberta. The College provides unlimited opportunities to all prospective and current employees regardless of their race or ethnic backgrounds. If you are self-driven, ambitious and hardworking, there is a place for you at Keyano.
What are the most significant contributions you’ve made to support black representation and excellence in the community or the country whether in Canada or overseas?
Since I came to Canada, I have mentored more than 10 young black men and women who have since passed their professional exams and became CPAs. I referred over 5 individuals to my employer(s) who eventually hired predominantly because of my reference. After getting hired, these individuals excelled and continued to positively enhance black representation. I volunteer on two Foundation Boards within the community. I provide the much needed financial perspective to these boards.
Black History Picture of Noel Ganduri

Priscilla Lothian-Hendrix

What does it mean to be black?
To be black means the identification that the colour of my skin has a history of oppression, and that knowledge motivates me to take advantage of the opportunities that my ancestors did not have.
What does Black History Month mean to you?
Black history is a moment in time to reflect and celebrate identity and embrace black Canadian leaders that have had an impact on community development and provided a sense of inclusion.
What advice do you have for current and future Black employees at Keyano College?
My advice for current black employees at Keyano College is to try and try again and to never give up. The mantra that has taken me this far is I will, I can, and I am.
What are the most significant contributions you’ve made to support black representation and excellence in the community or the country whether in Canada or overseas?
Throughout my experiences in education, I have had the opportunity to advocate for Canadian black youth within the school system and have taken part in celebrating black history through art, poetry, dance, and skits.
Black History Picture of Priscilla Lothian-Hendrix

Easter Bhebhe

What does it mean to be black?
It means that I am the cradle of all humankind.
What does Black History Month mean to you?
Black history month is a time to highlight the achievements of black people living and past. This month is to further celebrate and learn about the stories of black heroes, leaders, and activists who made a difference and allowed the progress that continues to move forward every day. Amidst the civil unrest that we continue to witness, this celebration will further highlight Black Lives. It is a month to recognize the history of people of African origin and consequently people as a whole.
What advice do you have for current and future Black employees at Keyano College?
Embrace who you are, maintain your identity. Learn what you have to learn, find common ground with others, appreciate other people and their cultures, blend for the good but don’t lose yourself in the process. Do not compromise your culture, values, and originality to be accepted. Give the world the best you can and be a role model as a black and beautiful person.
Portrait Picture

Robert Changirwa

What does it mean to be black?
To me, the word “BLACK” is a dynamic acronym where the characters can be assigned various meanings. B represents Brilliance and Blood. Being black is brilliance inherited and acquired, and Black is the epitome of brilliance. Blood is the rope tying together Africans and the African diaspora, weaving our distinct and shared histories into the black experience. L represents Love and Leadership. Being black in Canada requires love - we need love for one another and one love for all. The love of a neighbor is the gearbox that transforms the neighborhood and enhances community harmony. Being black is the embodiment of leadership attributes including resilience, partnership, and strength. A stands for Acknowledgement and Awareness. As black people, we acknowledge the history of our peoples and how that affects our contemporary reality. We are aware that the very same governmental, economic and social systems that we exist within, are the same ones that work to oppress us. We bear the burden of awareness that we are subject to discrimination based on our skin colour. C represents Comradery and Cooperation. Comradery is the engine that keeps our locomotion forward. Being black is working tangentially with your brothers and sisters, cooperating towards shared goals. K represents Knowledge and Kaleidoscopic. Being black requires the knowledge and wisdom of how to survive in the world as you are. Ultimately, Black identity is kaleidoscopic by nature – it is unique unto itself, there is no one way to be black in society.
What does Black History Month mean to you?
Black History Month is a period of reflection in terms of the people, events, achievements, and milestones spanning the history of Africans and the African diaspora. It serves to honour the past and present while exploring the many possibilities the future holds. It is a month to meditate and fathom events and milestones, many invisible to non-Black individuals. It is a time to simulate what we have done, who we are, and what we can do. Carter G. Woodson, founding father of Black History Month stated, “If a race has no history, it has no worthwhile tradition, it becomes a negligible factor in the thought of the world, and it stands in danger of being exterminated”. Therefore, there should be concerted efforts by institutions and media to highlight our existence and legacy.
What advice do you have for current and future Black employees at Keyano College?
The existence of black professors at institutions like Keyano is a testament to their capability and skillset. Black professors are given the opportunity to not only conduct the duties required by their position but to also create awareness and disseminate learned knowledge from their experience. We have been given the platform to educate students and inform their worldviews. In my case, I am providing a solid academic foundation to engineering students for future endeavors – but I also function as a representation of my community. In this way, I am an example of what we can do. By working at Keyano, our unseen talents come to light. This visibility puts us in a position to inspire our youth and encourage them to reach higher. As Black instructors, we should constantly reflect on the quality of education we provide to our students and the example that we set for our youth and our community.
What are the most significant contributions you’ve made to support black representation and excellence in the community or the country whether in Canada or overseas?
I have worked at Shell leadership, and executed projects not only beneficial for Shell, but also the community we live in. I also worked as the Team Lead where I supervised and mentored a diverse stream of project engineers. Internationally, I worked on a World Bank-sponsored hydroelectric power generation project in Kiambere, Kenya which was the second-largest power plant and I organized sponsorship for numerous girls across Africa under the umbrella of World Vision to fund their education and in turn their future. Locally, I volunteer with the APEGA YMM branch by mentoring a diverse base of engineers, executing community activities that impact the youth and I am the APEGA outreach lead for Keyano College activities involving students.
Head Shot of Robert Changirwa