Keyano Future students Keyano Current students Keyano Community

Diploma in Occupational Health & Safety Course Descriptions

All courses within the OH&S Diploma Program have a tuition of $550 CAN each.

Course code, Title, and Description

DOHS 4110      Effective Communication

Instructor: Joanne Fraser


To bring awareness to the importance of OHS and maintain a safe workplace, OHS professionals must be able to listen actively, think critically, speak persuasively, and deliver messages effectively. This requires a solid understanding of the different stakeholders and an ability to address their different needs and concerns. This course explores the role of communications concerning OHS in organizations, with an emphasis on negotiation and facilitation as tools to manage the OHS function more effectively.

 

Modules:

1.       Influencing Organizational Stakeholders

2.       Communicating the Value of OHS

3.       Relevant Messages and Presentations

4.       Facilitating Meetings and Information Sessions

5.       Communicating Essential Feedback

6.       Negotiating on Behalf of an OHS Culture

About the instructor:
Joanne Fraser is an Associate of RiverSystems - Leadership, Strategy & Organizational Development, which provides training and facilitation services for government, non-government and private sector clients. As an independent consultant with over twelve years of management experience, she has designed and delivered training in leadership skills, interpersonal communication, coaching basics, negotiation, team building, project management and strategic planning for these clients.

Joanne holds a B.Sc. (U. of Saskatchewan), an M.Sc. in Comparative Development and International Policy (U. of Bristol, England), and a Certificate in Adult Education (St. Francis Xavier University).

 

DOHS 4130      Human Performance Leadership

Instructor: Elaine Leclerc

 

The success of organizations depends in large part on their commitment to effective leadership, which in turn leads to the overall performance of the organization. Effective leaders contribute to the success of their organization by driving productivity and growth, and building talent.

This course is aimed at OHS professionals who are transitioning into a management position with a higher level of responsibilities and who wish to sharpen their leadership skills. It does so by providing tools and strategies to motivate employees, build partnerships, manage change and deliver results at the individual, team and organizational levels.

 

Modules:

1.     Role of Leadership

2.     Emotional and Authentic Leadership

3.     Employee Commitment and Engagement

4.     Continuous Improvement and Innovation

5.     Leading High Performance Teams

About the instructor: 

Elaine Leclerc is President of HCS Training and Consulting. She has been providing training and organizational consulting services to business, industry and government for over 25 years.
In addition to designing and delivering workshops and speaking at conferences, Elaine provides coaching to individuals and teams, and helps organizations manage transitions and create healthy and effective workplace environments.
Elaine has had extensive experience working in highly regulated industries where effective leadership is an imperative for developing, supporting and maintaining a vibrant safety culture.
She is a graduate of the University of New Brunswick and lives in Douglas Harbour, New Brunswick.

 

DOHS 4140      Effective Workplace Training

Instructor: Elaine Leclerc

 

To be able to educate the company's employees on matters of OHS, safety professionals need to be skilled and knowledgeable in effective methods and techniques to plan, develop, conduct, and evaluate adult education and training programs. With this knowledge, the safety professional can support formal training and on-the-job coaching. The skills acquired can be applied to mentoring colleagues dealing with health and safety situations and help them develop new skills.

This course takes the student through all stages of the training and education process; from the planning phase, via how to design training components, to preparing instructional plans and conveying the necessary content by means of instruction. The last part will be addressing the evaluation of the process.

 

Modules:

1.     Human Resource Planning

2.     Identifying Training Needs

3.     Designing Training

4.     Understanding the Adult Learner

5.     Preparing Instructional Plans

6.     Delivering Training

7.     Evaluating Training Effectiveness

About the instructor: 

Elaine Leclerc is President of HCS Training and Consulting. She has been providing training and organizational consulting services to business, industry and government for over 25 years. 
In addition to designing and delivering workshops and speaking at conferences, Elaine provides coaching to individuals and teams, and helps organizations manage transitions and create healthy and effective workplace environments. 
Elaine has had extensive experience working in highly regulated industries where effective leadership is an imperative for developing, supporting and maintaining a vibrant safety culture.
She is a graduate of the University of New Brunswick and lives in Douglas Harbour, New Brunswick.

 

DOHS 4150      Psychological Health and Safety

Instructor: Susan Sawatzky

 

The World Health Organization defines health as a "state of complete physical, mental and social well-being..." Yet until recently, mental and social well-being have been largely ignored by health and safety practitioners. As Canada begins creating a national mental health strategy, it becomes more important for health and safety practitioners to understand the key components required to enhance psychological health and safety in the workplace.

This course is focused on providing the background in theory and information needed to be able to properly address this quickly evolving area of health and safety. It will examine theories relating to workplace stress and its interrelationship with mental health. Strategies for dealing with counterproductive workplace behaviours such as conflict, workplace bullying and workplace violence will be examined with practical approaches and tools provided to assist in addressing these concerns. Motivational theories and their applications in the workplace will be reviewed, showing ways to increase employee engagement in a safety culture. Finally, a comprehensive roadmap will be provided, based on the new CSA-Z1003 Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace Standard, to assist organizations in advancing toward a psychologically healthy workplace environment.

 

Modules:

1. Defining Psychological Health and Safety
2. Stress
3. Mental Health
4. Conflict
5. Workplace Bullying
6. Workplace Violence
7. Motivation
8. Developing a PH&S Program

 

About the instructor: 

Susan Sawatzky, owner of In-Scope Solutions, is an independent consultant for health and safety in the oil and gas and mining industries. Recent industry experience has included assisting a major mining corporation negotiate a fatigue based variance in response to new strict fatigue legislation in the Yukon. Susan was also involved in creating fatigue policy and guidelines for the Canadian oil and gas industry. Her work, though a key safety association, was instrumental in advancing the Fatigue Guiding Principles Agreement signed by the 6 key associations for the Canada oil and gas industry.

Susan holds a B.Ed. and has over 15 years of experience in resource development, and in education and training.

 

DOHS 4210      Managing Substance Abuse in the Workplace

Instructor: Nadine Wentzell

 

This course identifies the multiple factors and realities of substance abuse in the workplace, and the role of the OHS supervisor or manager in addressing this issue. It also provides a process for implementing a culture change in the organization. The key elements of a drug and alcohol policy are identified, and include the many considerations involved in testing, as well as current general practices in Canada. The course emphasizes education and awareness for supervisors, managers and all staff; resources for treatment and support; and the need for an ongoing communication strategy to incorporate drug and alcohol awareness into the business/organizational structure.

 

Modules:

1.     Introduction to Substance Abuse in the Workplace

2.     What's my Role and Where do I Start

3.     The Foundation Piece: A Drug and Alcohol Policy

4.     Investigation

5.     Testing

6.     Implementation, Education and Training Assessment

 

About the instructor:

Nadine Wentzell is a consultant, speaker, author and pharmacist, with over 25 years of experience addressing substance abuse in the workplace. Her perspectives are many and varied: as an educator and pharmacist , she has worked in community, hospital, regulatory and consultant practices; as a narcotic inspector with Health Canada for 10 years, she conducted investigations and regulatory monitoring across Canada; she has also taught Drug Investigative Techniques at the Canadian Police College in Ottawa; she has worked with federal, provincial and regional police officers, enforcement groups, businesses and organizations; she has given courses on drug diversion and prescription drug abuse at Dalhousie University; Nadine was also involved in establishing the Pharmacists’ Addiction Assistance Program for members of the pharmacy community dealing with substance abuse.

Drug and alcohol policy development, training, education, prevention and awareness are the cornerstones of Nadine's work. She has presented hundreds of workshops on substance abuse to diverse groups, some of which include students, physicians, business leaders and front-line staff, human resource professionals, and safety managers and supervisors.

 

DOHS 4220      Disability Management

Instructor: Shelly Bischoff

 

This course lays out the best practices in the field of disability management (DM), and their application to the case and claim management process. The course also outlines the role of OHS professionals and affiliated stakeholders responsible for DM, and presents appropriate engagement and communication strategies, as well as legislation pertaining to DM.

 

Modules:

1.     Introduction to Disability Management in the Workplace

2.     Management and the Law

3.     The Return to Work Process

4.     Disability Benefit Plans

5.     Disability Assessment and Rehabilitation Programs

6.     Preventing Mental Health Disability and Addiction in the Workplace

 

About the instructor:

Shelly Ptolemy is President of Ptolemy & Associates lnc.  She is also a Registered Nurse (SIAST), a Certified Occupational Health Nurse (Grant McEwan College), a Certified Human Resource Professional and Certified Health and Safety Consultant (CSSP) with 17 years of experience in the areas of OHS, wellness and disability management, and is a national speaker in these areas of expertise. She holds a Nursing Diploma (SIAST) and an Occupational Health Nurse Certificate (Grant McEwan College)

Shelly has worked with both public and private sector organizations and implemented a National award-winning disability management program in the municipal sector in 2000. She has served on the Alberta provincial boards of Alberta Motor Association, Governors for Children, McMan Youth, Family & Community Services, and was appointed by the government to the Practice Review Council for the Alberta College and Association of Physical Therapists and Alberta Occupational Health Nurses Association.

 

DOHS 4240      Working at Elevation

Instructor: Spenser MacPherson

 

There are a great number of serious injuries, deaths and hazards that result from working at elevations in comparison to other workplace risks. When a fall occurs from elevations the outcome is usually severe and often fatal.

This program is intended to help the safety practitioner reduce the risks associated with working from elevations. This program is also appropriate for a fall protection program administrator in lieu of, or to compliment, a safety practitioner. At the end of the course, the participant will have the ability to develop, implement, and administer a fall protection code of practice (program) in order to effectively communicate appropriate controls that reduce the risk of working from elevations.

 

Modules:

1.     Introduction to Managing the Risk of Working at Elevations

2.     Lessons Learned and Technical Information

3.     Statutes and Standards

4.     Fall Protection Program

5.     Fall Protection Equipment Care and Maintenance

6.     Competency and Communication

7.     Administration, Program Review, and Course Summary

 

About the instructor: 

Spenser MacPherson is the owner of SEM Partnerships Inc. in Charlottetown, PEI. He is a consulting occupational health and safety professional with experience in health, safety, and environmental (HSE) management systems and occupational hygiene. Spenser has a B.Sc. in Chemistry. He is a Canadian Registered Safety Professional (CRSP) and Registered Occupational Hygienist (ROH).

Mr. MacPherson has over 17 years of experience in HSE management, training, and auditing. He has completed work in a variety of industries that include aerospace, bioscience, education, enforcement, construction, mining/metallurgy, manufacturing, forestry, and oil & gas to name a few. He has developed and delivered HSE training programs for employees, supervisors, and managers through the Construction Association of PEI and for various employers and clients.

Spenser is active in the local and national level of the Canadian Society of Safety Engineering (CSSE) as a professional member. He holds the Certified Health and Safety Consultant (CHSC) designation from the CSSE. He is also a professional member of the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) and member of the Atlantic Section and national American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA).

Prior to working the HSE field, Spenser spent 13 years in the carpentry trade. He has extensive fall protection experience from both ends of the organizational charts. Working at heights between 3-4 metres to over 50 m, he understands the challenges workers, supervisors, managers, OHS Officers, and safety practitioners all experience.

 

DOHS 4250      Personal Protective Equipment

Instructor: Rob Morphew

 

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) may be one of the most misunderstood parts of the safety professional's tools to control hazards. This course will consider all factors involved in the selection, care, and use of PPE. This course also lifts the confusion and misunderstanding that arrises when people are confronted with misused or mixed terminology that is applied by many to describe similar items. 

This course will examine hazard control and the hierarchy of control in the elimination and control of hazards workers may be exposed to in the workplace. It provides an extensive overview of PPE in regards to the topics: head, eye and face, hearing, fall arrest, respiratory, hand and arm, foot, and work clothing.

Safety professionals will be encouraged to develop a current up to date library of resources and vendors which to draw on for the selection of the most appropriate PPE for their programs and workers.

 

Modules:

1.     Control of Hazards

2.     What is PPE?

3.     Selection, Care, and Use of PPE

4.     Policies, Procedures, and Codes of Practice

5.     Integration and Implementation

 

About the instructor: 

Rob Morphew is the Director, Health, Safety and Environment for Calgary Co-op and has been with them for 9 years. Prior to joining Calgary Co-op he worked with Canadian Regional Airlines (Air Canada Jazz). He is a Canadian Registered Safety Professional (CRSP), a Registered Environmental Practitioner (EP) and has a diploma in Business Management. 

He has over 20 years experience as a Safety Professional. He has been engaged on a number of occasions to teach Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety at the post-secondary level at the University of Calgary and recently engaged to contribute for the OHS diploma program with the University of New Brunswick.

He is very active in the community currently serving as Chair Calgary Chapter of the Canadian Society of Safety Engineering (CSSE). 

 

DOHS 4260      Program Planning & Wellness in the Workplace

Instructor: Carol Reimer

 

Understanding the factors that influence workplace health provides a framework for the development of wellness programs, as many chronic conditions are preventable when the underlying causes of poor health are effectively addressed. An effective program can have a positive impact on employee turnover, absenteeism and productivity, which in turn lowers employee benefit costs.
 
This course guides OHS professionals through a four-step program planning process: to establish a starting point and sense of direction, the course launches with strategies for conducting an employee health assessment; the planning and implementation sections provide critical content, as well as numerous examples of successful programs in action; the course then wraps up with techniques and tools for effective program evaluation. By the end of this course, participants should be able to develop their own workplace wellness program.

 

Modules:

1.     Introduction to Wellness

2.     Practices and Behaviours that Impact Worker Health

3.     Situational Workplace Assessment

4.     Forming an Effective Plan

5.     Implementing a Wellness Program

6.     Program Measurement & Evaluation

 

About the instructor:

Carol Reimer, owner of Verus Consulting, is a management consultant who has worked on contracts with multi-national companies and smaller organizations, and has developed policy for health programs in conjunction with the World Health Organization and the UN. In addition to her consulting work, Carol has taught communications, health care systems, and community health for the Faculty of Nursing at UNB.

Ms. Reimer is a member of the New Brunswick Occupational Health Nurses Group and the Ontario Occupational Health Nurses Association. She earned her BScN from the University of Alberta, and her MSc from the University of Calgary, and now resides in Fredericton, NB.

 

DOHS 4270      Fatigue Management

Instructor: Susan Sawatzky

 

Fatigue and its management is an issue that has become increasingly important in the safety profession, and which has led to major legislative changes in Canada and the United States in the past five years.  The major objectives of this course are to help OHS professionals better understand this key safety issue and how to manage it.

To achieve this, the course highlights modern research and knowledge relating to the causes and effects of fatigue. It then discusses fatigue as a safety issue and introduces tools and methods to assess, manage and mitigate fatigue hazards. The history of fatigue management is also briefly surveyed to help participants better understand the components required to create a comprehensive fatigue risk management plan.

 

Modules:

1.     Defining the Need

2.     Fatigue 101

3.     Fatigue as a Safety Issue

4.     Managing Fatigue

5.     The History of Fatigue Management

6.     Creating a Comprehensive FRMP

 

About the instructor: 

Susan Sawatzky, owner of In-Scope Solutions, is an independent consultant for health and safety in the oil and gas and mining industries. Recent industry experience has included assisting a major mining corporation negotiate a fatigue based variance in response to new strict fatigue legislation in the Yukon. Susan was also involved in creating fatigue policy and guidelines for the Canadian oil and gas industry. Her work, though a key safety association, was instrumental in advancing the Fatigue Guiding Principles Agreement signed by the 6 key associations for the Canada oil and gas industry.

Susan holds a B.Ed. and has over 15 years of experience in resource development, and in education and training.

 

DOHS 4290      Data Driven Decision Making

Instructor: Kari Dunfield

 

The degree to which an organization manages occupational health and safety (OHS) has important implications for a wide range of stakeholders. Increasing scrutiny from many of these stakeholders results in a demand for high quality information; information that must be relevant, valid, comparable, and reliable.

 

This course is intended for any individuals who have a stake in the day-to-day management and support of organizational processes, or those who would like to improve their organization’s performance through a process orientation and process control. In every aspect of our lives we are both consuming and creating vast amounts of information. However, much of the promise of data-driven approaches within organizations has failed to materialize because managers find it difficult to translate this data into decisive action. The general objective of this course is to fill this gap by providing the student with tools and techniques that can be used to make business decisions with confidence.

 

Modules:

1.     Why Use Data Driven Decision Making

2.     What to Measure and How to Measure

3.     Basic Statistics

4.     Regression and Correlation

5.     Benchmarking, Continuous Improvement, and Justification of Investment

 

About the Instructor
Kari Dunfield is currently a senior partner in Verus Consulting, a management consulting firm providing practical assistance to organizations and corporations through research, process redesign and strategic planning.  She has a broad range of experience, from start-ups to international organizations. 

Prior to starting her own business, Kari was the manager of Marketing and Instructional Strategy at LearnStream. She was responsible for leading a team of specialists in market research, competitive intelligence, marketing strategy and brand development. Kari also worked with the consulting and instructional design practice at LearnStream advising on projects for the World Health Organization, the Wharton School of Business, Nortel and Health Canada.

Kari received her BSc in Physics (Honours) and her MSc in Laser Spectroscopy from the University of New Brunswick